News Feature

Castine
Originally published in Castine Patriot, September 12, 2019
Greenhouse sprouts at Adams School

The finished product

The greenhouse at the Adams School took months to put together, but is now ready for use.

Photo by Monique Labbe Order prints of selected PBP photos.

by Monique Labbe

Gone are the days of the Adams School Garden Club planting seeds in cups and watching them grow. This year, the school has a new greenhouse, and Garden Club participants now have a space to not only plant, but harvest.

Teacher Tracy Lameyer led the charge to get the greenhouse going during the 2018-19 school year, and applied for grant funding, updated the school board on the progress, and found two able-bodied men in Union 93 Technology Coordinator Richard Avery and Union 93 Superintendent Mark Hurvitt to assemble to finished product.

“It definitely took some time,” said Lameyer.

The greenhouse installation was finally completed in June, after being put up bit-by-bit during the winter and spring. It was used over the summer primarily by Deborah Corey, who “took it over” to collect for her nonprofit Blue Angels project to combat hunger in the area.

Now that the school year has started, Lameyer and the students have taken their greenhouse back and will use it to plant fruits, vegetables and flowers.

“It’s going to be great; the kids will actually have something that they can work on,” she said.

Garden beds outside of the greenhouse are currently producing everything from tomatoes to cabbage and eggplants.

Some of the produce will go to school lunches and snacks, and some will continue to be donated to Blue Angels. The 15-person Garden Club starts next week, and will continue working year-round in the greenhouse, something that in previous years was never able to happen.

Lameyer has also started a once-a-week program called Early Sprouts, for the younger students at the school.

The funding for the project came exclusively from grants and monies Lameyer was able to obtain, including a grant from Maine Community Fast Track Program’s Perloff Foundation Grant, and a grant from Maine Farmland Trust.

“I’m really excited to be able to do this,” said Lameyer. “I think we’ll be out here pretty often.”

The greenhouse is located behind the school, tucked away from the playground, a location approved by the school board.

Nearly ready

Tomatoes are almost ripe for the picking in the garden at the Adams School.

Photo by Monique Labbe
The finished product

The greenhouse at the Adams School took months to put together, but is now ready for use.

Photo by Monique Labbe
Gardening education

Gardens at the Adams School provide hands on education for students.

Photo by Monique Labbe
Nature and gardening

A butterfly enjoys a stop on a leafy green in the garden at the Adams School.

Photo by Monique Labbe